How many Orthopaedic surgeons are there in Kenya?

The number of orthopaedic surgeons in Kenya is estimated at sixty. Those registered as such in the current Medical Practitioners and Dentist Board (MP&DB) register are 31. This gives a ratio of 1: 550,000. Only two provincial hospitals, two district and four mission hospitals have an orthopaedic surgeon.

How long does it take to be an orthopedic surgeon in Kenya?

There has been no formal postgraduate orthopaedic training programme in Kenya until recently. So how have the practicing 60 or so orthopaedic surgeons been trained. The basic medical training takes five academic years. In the 3rd year students are introduced to orthopaedics and trauma for six weeks.

How much are orthopedic surgeons paid in Kenya?

A person working as a Surgeon – Orthopedic in Kenya typically earns around 653,000 KES per month. Salaries range from 339,000 KES (lowest) to 998,000 KES (highest). This is the average monthly salary including housing, transport, and other benefits.

How many orthopedic surgeons are female?

In the United States, women constitute approximately 51 percent of the population and 49 percent of the total workforce. However, of the 29,613 orthopaedic surgeons in the most recent AAOS survey, 6.5 percent were women, with just 0.1 percent choosing not to identify their gender.

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How many Orthopedics are there?

According to Definitive Healthcare’s Physicians platform, which tracks over 1.7 million physicians, there are more than 30,500 orthopedic surgeons in the U.S. About half of those surgeons report a sub-specialty with the 3 most common being sports medicine, hand surgery, and joint replacement.

How much do surgeons earn in Kenya?

How much money does a person working in Surgery make in Kenya? A person working in Surgery in Kenya typically earns around 422,000 KES per month. Salaries range from 142,000 KES (lowest average) to 656,000 KES (highest average, actual maximum salary is higher).

How many surgeons do we have in Kenya?

The body champions the welfare of surgeons in the country and has a current membership of 300 surgeons throughout the country. Surgeons can further form associations that cater for their different medical specialties.

Who is the richest doctor in Kenya?

Below is a list of top 10 richest doctors in Kenya:

  • Dr. Catherine Nyongesa. She is the owner of Texas Cancer Centre, who is an oncology specialist by profession. …
  • Dr. Betty Gikonyo. …
  • Dr. M.M Qureshi. …
  • Dr. Betty Musau. …
  • Dr. Pancho Sharma. …
  • Dr. Adil Waris. …
  • Dr. Saroop Bansil. …
  • Dr. Stanley Ominde.

What is the highest paying job in Kenya?

Highest Paying Jobs in Kenya and their Salaries

  1. Politics. Politics is the highest paying job in Kenya. …
  2. Aviation. Aviation is one of the best paying careers in Kenya. …
  3. Law. …
  4. Medicine. …
  5. Engineering. …
  6. Journalism. …
  7. Non-Governmental Organizations. …
  8. Accounting and Actuary.

How much money do doctors make in Kenya?

A person working in Doctor / Physician in Kenya typically earns around 345,000 KES per month. Salaries range from 127,000 KES (lowest average) to 583,000 KES (highest average, actual maximum salary is higher). This is the average monthly salary including housing, transport, and other benefits.

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Who is the highest paid orthopedic surgeon?

Private Practice Salary

Cardiologists, in comparison, earned $497,000. Orthopedic surgeons who are partners in a private practice, or otherwise self-employed, were the highest earners among orthopedic surgeons, with an annual income of $536,000.

What is the highest paid doctor?

The highest-paid physician specialties

Specialists in plastic surgery earned the highest physician salary in 2020 — an average of $526,000. Orthopedics/orthopedic surgery is the next-highest specialty ($511,000 annually), followed by cardiology at $459,000 annually.

Why is there not many female surgeons?

An old boys’ network, exclusion from events, scepticism from patients and incompatibility with family life are among the factors fuelling a dearth of women in surgery, research has revealed.

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