Is African American Vernacular English a dialect?

African-American Vernacular English (AAVE) may be considered a dialect, ethnolect or sociolect. While it is clear that there is a strong historical relationship between AAVE and earlier Southern U.S. dialects, the origins of AAVE are still a matter of debate.

Is Ebonics considered a language?

school board inspired nationwide debate with its endorsement of Ebonics as a separate language. … 18, when the Oakland, Cal., School Board unanimously passed a resolution declaring Ebonics to be the “genetically-based” language of its African American students, not a dialect of English.

Why is Ebonics a dialect?

Many scholars hold that Ebonics, like several English creoles, developed from contacts between nonstandard varieties of colonial English and African languages. … Ebonics is a vernacular form of American English used in the home or for day-to-day communication rather than for formal occasions.

Is it OK to say Ebonics?

While the term is generally avoided by most linguists, it is used elsewhere (such as on Internet message boards), often for ridiculing AAE, particularly when this is parodied as drastically differing from Standard American English.

Where did black English come from?

History. African-American English began as early as the seventeenth century, when the Atlantic slave trade brought African slaves into Southern colonies (which eventually became the Southern United States) in the late eighteenth century.

What language did slaves speak?

In the English colonies Africans spoke an English-based Atlantic Creole, generally called plantation creole. Low Country Africans spoke an English-based creole that came to be called Gullah.

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Where is African American English spoken?

Since the late 1980s, the term has been used ambiguously, sometimes with reference to only Ebonics, or, as it is known to linguists, African American Vernacular English (AAVE; the English dialect spoken by many African Americans in the United States), and sometimes with reference to both Ebonics and Gullah, the English …

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