Quick Answer: What year did South Africa host World Cup?

2010 FIFA World Cup South Africa™

How many World Cups did South Africa host?

The World Cup Finals is the most widely viewed sporting event in the world, with an estimated 715.1 million people watching the 2006 tournament final. South Africa have appeared in the FIFA World Cup on three occasions in 1998, 2002, and 2010.

Will South Africa host the World Cup again?

Upon the selection of Canada–Mexico–United States bid for the 2026 FIFA World Cup, the tournament will be the first to be hosted by more than two countries.

2010 FIFA World Cup.

Nation Vote
Round 1
South Africa 14
Morocco 10
Egypt

How many times has South Africa won the Rugby World Cup?

Team records

Team Champions Quarter-finals
South Africa 3 (1995, 2007, 2019) 2 (2003, 2011)
Australia 2 (1991, 1999) 3 (1995, 2007, 2019)
England 1 (2003) 3 (1987, 1999, 2011)
France 3 (1991, 2015, 2019)

Who won World Cup South Africa?

Dutch strongarm tactics kept the match goalless for 90 minutes, but Andres Iniesta scored in extra-time to give Spain their first World Cup win.

How much did South Africa make from the World Cup?

For South Africa’s economy, a direct benefit of hosting the tournament was that it added 0.4% to national economic growth, translating into R38-billion that year, as estimated by the finance minister, Pravin Gordhan.

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Why was South Africa banned from the World Cup?

In the World Cup, the Greek government banned South Africa from the 1979 competition in Athens. South Africa competed in the 1980 edition in Bogotá. The prospect of their appearing in the 1981 edition, due to be staged at Waterville in Ireland, caused it to be cancelled.

Is Afrikaans a language?

Afrikaans is a southern African language. Today six in 10 of the almost seven million Afrikaans speakers in South Africa are estimated to be black. … Like several other South African languages, Afrikaans is a cross-border language spanning sizeable communities of speakers in Namibia, Botswana and Zimbabwe.

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