What does South Africa trade with other countries?

South Africa is very open to international trade, which represents 59.2% of the country’s GDP. The country mainly exports platinum (9.3%), motor vehicles (7.5%), iron ores (6.5%), coal and similar solid fuels (5.3%) and gold (5.2%).

What is the main trade of South Africa?

Its main export commodities are gold, diamonds, platinum, other metals and minerals, machinery and equipment. South Africa’s main trade partners are the European Union, China, US, Japan and India.

What does South Africa import from other countries?

South Africa main imports are: machinery (23.5 percent of total imports), mineral products (15.1 percent), vehicles and aircraft vessels (10 percent), chemicals (10.9 percent), equipment components (8.1 percent) and iron and steel products (5.3 percent).

What are the 5 major exports of South Africa?

In 2017, South Africa exported mostly: mineral products (25.1 percent of total exports, including chrome, manganese, vanadium, vermiculite, ilmenite, palladium, rutile and zirconium, crude and coal), precious metals (16.7 percent, mainly gold, platinum, diamonds and jewellery), vehicles and aircraft vessels (11.9 …

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What does South Africa export to us?

This category includes gold, platinum and diamonds. The second biggest export category for South Africa to the USA is products of Iron and Steel with just over 18% of South African exports to the USA and the third biggest export category being Mineral products with just under 16%. This category includes iron ore.

Which country does South Africa trade the most?

South Africa’s top trading partners are China, Germany, the United States, the UK, India and Japan. South Africa is the EU’s largest trading partner in Africa.

Main Partner Countries.

Main Customers (% of Exports) 2019
China 10.7%
Germany 8.0%
United States 7.0%
United Kingdom 5.2%

What food does South Africa import?

In this category, South Africa’s main imports are wheat, rice, and corn, with an import value of US$986.01 million. The increasing demand for wheat – more than 3 million tons – is rarely covered by the local production, which usually accounts for only half of that amount.

Does South Africa import a lot?

Currently the value of Imports and Exports per quarter equates to roughly 60% of South Africa’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). So trade is an extremely import part of the South African economy.

What does South Africa produce the most?

South Africa is the world’s biggest producer of gold and platinum and one of the leading producers of base metals and coal. The country’s diamond industry is the fourth-largest in the world, with only Botswana, Canada and Russia producing more diamonds each year.

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Which product does South Africa export the most?

Searchable List of South Africa’s Most Valuable Export Products

RANK SOUTH AFRICAN EXPORT PRODUCT CHANGE
1 Platinum (unwrought) +6%
2 Cars +9.4%
3 Iron ores, concentrates +35.9%
4 Coal, solid fuels made from coal -22.4%

Which products are made in South Africa?

South Africa is synonymous for its mineral riches such gold, diamond, platinum, manganese-ore and coal, while the fruits of its farming industry are savoured over the world. This includes wine, fruit, medicinal plants, wool, livestock, game and cut flowers.

What fruit does South Africa export?

Citrus fruits constituted the largest share of exported fruit, with a share value of 40.8 % collectively. Oranges topped the list of fruit exports by South Africa with a share value of 21.4 %, followed by table grapes, apples and lemons constituting a share value of 14.7 %, 12.4 % and 9.1 % respectively.

What is the main export of Africa?

In most African states one or two primary commodities dominate the export trade—e.g., petroleum and petroleum products in Libya, Nigeria, Algeria, Egypt, Gabon, the Republic of the Congo, and Angola; iron ore in Mauritania and Liberia; copper in Zambia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo; cotton in Chad; coffee in …

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