Why are the bottom leaves of my African violet drooping?

Watering is at the root of all African violet drooping leaves’ problem. … This is because the roots need air as well as water, and soggy soil drowns the roots. Furthermore, in wet situations, root rot fungi destroy the African violet roots causing the plant to droop.

Why are the lower leaves of my African violet drooping?

There may be a couple of reasons why your plant is wilting. It could be that the plant is too dry and needs water. On the other hand, wilting African violet leaves may also be a sign of overwatering. This can occur when the plant is watered too much, especially if the plant is in a plastic pot.

How do I know if my African violet has root rot?

Distinguishing Symptoms

  1. Plant topples over at the base. The top part of your African Violet may separate from the root system entirely, though the crown is still intact.
  2. Roots are decayed.
  3. Roots have yellow or yellowish-brown stripes on them.

Do African violets need to be repotted?

African violets should be repotted about twice a year, or every 5-6 months. One mature, this simply means repotting the plant with some fresh soil, into the same size pot. … Over the course of time, your violet will have lost (or had removed) its older, lower, leaves, forming a “neck”.

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How do I know if my African violet is healthy?

The plants thrive on a happy medium in terms of sunlight. You can tell if your violet has proper sunlight by checking the leaves. In too much sunlight, the leaves turn yellow and the edges burn. In too little sunlight, the leaves will appear to be a healthy green, but there will be no blooms.

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